1st COVID-19 related death reported in Lakes Area

Thursday, June 18, 2020

Local health officials are extending condolences and urging caution after Dickinson County confirmed its first death related to COVID-19 on Monday. The patient was a male over the age of 80, according to information from Dickinson County Public Health.

The news came on a day when the county's total cases topped 150 on Monday.

"We wish to extend our condolences to this individual’s family," Lakes Regional Family Medicine physician and Dickinson County Public Health Medical Director Zach Borus said. "Lakes Regional Healthcare, Dickinson County Public Health and all of our key partners throughout the county and state continue to work to limit the spread and impact of this virus in our communities."

State officials said 51 Dickinson County residents had recovered from the coronavirus Tuesday evening. Another 108 cases are considered active, for a total of 159 cases as of Tuesday evening. An individual is considered recovered once they meet two criteria, according to Sarah Reisetter, deputy director at the Iowa Department of Public Health. A span of seven days must have passed since the onset of symptoms, and the individual must have been symptom-free for three consecutive days.

The Iowa Department of Public Health statistics show 135 of the county's current cases were reported over the last 16 days. The county has seen as many as 20 cases reported in a single day. Monday was the second day Dickinson County hit that threshold — the first was June 11. Officials with Lakes Regional Healthcare said currently no positive cases are in need of ventilators or any of the hospital's four critical care units.

Across the county line to the south, Clay County rose from 15 total cases in late May to 83 cases as of Tuesday. Buena Vista County's 1,600 total cases continue to rank in the state's top five, and it leads the state in per capita infections at about eight in every 100 people — twice that of number two Crawford County. Dickinson County now has the 17th highest infection rate per capita statewide — approaching one in every 100 people.

Bill Bumgarner, president of Spencer Hospital, released a statement Friday regarding the region's increase in confirmed cases.

"COVID-19 infections have increased significantly in our region since the Memorial Day holiday," Bumgarner said. "There have been too many social and recreational gatherings and too few masks. Does the Iowa Great Lakes Region have the resolve to do what's needed to reduce the rate of COVID-19 infections? Only if we change. Let's care for one another and our communities. Wear a mask in public. Social distance. Encourage your family and friends to join you. We can do this. We must."

Dickinson County Public Health continues to urge the public to follow recommended precautions in stemming the spread of the virus, such as washing hands often, avoiding close contact with others and wearing a face mask or shield when unable to remain at a distance. The public should also be covering coughs and sneezes, according to public health officials, and disinfecting surfaces regularly in addition to monitoring themselves for symptoms — fever, cough and shortness of breath.

Statewide, 669 Iowans have died due to COVID-19, while 15,092 have recovered.

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  • HERE IN CA. WE ARE NOW REQUIRED TO WEAR MASKS OUT IN PUBLIC INCLUDING STORES, CLUBS, ETC.

    -- Posted by drpete on Fri, Jun 19, 2020, at 1:36 PM
  • Here in Iowa we prefer the freedom to spread disease.

    -- Posted by MethodMan on Mon, Jun 22, 2020, at 4:33 PM
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