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M.O.M.: My Opinionated Mouth
Leah Cauthron

The truth about fast food

Posted Thursday, February 2, 2012, at 9:15 AM
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  • Everyone knows not to eat too much fast food. If they don't do that, that's their choice. But I don't get concerned over "warnings" from the FDA and their corporatist oligarchs. They've been wrong on literally half their approvals throughout their history.

    I'll take my chances with the big Mac.

    -- Posted by jlees on Thu, Feb 2, 2012, at 11:38 PM
  • Leah, I don't think we should go out and panic about acrylamide in foods. Acrylamide is a naturally occuring product formed when starchy foods are cooked at high temperatures (an amino acid combines with a sugar). Although acrylamide was first found in foods in 2002, one could easily assume that it has always been present in starchy foods cooked at high temperatures (i.e., its presence in food is nothing new). And I realize that this information does not fit your agenda, but acrylamide is also found in coffee, bread (there's a starchy food baked at high temperatures), black olives, and prunes just to name a few. Are there reasons to limit the consumption of fast food? Absolutely. Is acrylamide in the french fries such a reason? Probably not.

    -- Posted by DaveMunson on Fri, Feb 3, 2012, at 4:52 PM
  • While I would think most people of sense would realize that McDonalds should not be daily fare, I don't actually know from acrylamide and pink slime as far as its harm in small, irregular doses. I'd be interested in a study of whether McDonalds fries contain crack. Because I can think of no rational reason to believe they actually taste that good, compared with what I could prepare at home (or the tasty goodness of the home made steak fries at Terrazzo Coffeehouse, for example) there are times I have an overwhelming craving for them.

    Here is a better reason to eschew the Big Mac, Filet of Fish, Quarter Pounder and French fries:

    http://www.mcspotlight.org/campaigns/tra...

    Of all the points on this information sheet, robbing the poor is something on which I'd be interested to know more facts. Do they pay money to the citizens in these countries who would be growing food on it for their own subsistence, or is McDonalds truly stripping the third world of the resources it has so we in the superpowers can be fatter?

    It does seem like something McDonalds, or most any American conglomerate, would do -- strip the fields of poor countries for its own profits, then scold the citizens of those nations for being unable to be self-sufficient.

    -- Posted by AmyPeterson on Sat, Feb 4, 2012, at 10:47 AM
  • Amy, the point is that whether you buy fries at McD's, BK, or the homemade steak fries at Terrazzo, they would all contain acrylamide since it is a natural byproduct of cooking starchy foods at high temperature (not to mention that the coffee at the coffeehouse also contains acrylamide). I was merely putting the facts out without hype.

    -- Posted by DaveMunson on Sat, Feb 4, 2012, at 11:36 AM
  • Fair enough, Dave Munson. On perhaps another tangent, next time I go to a fast food drive through, I think I will do something like this:

    http://www.viddler.com/v/2533dfeb

    -- Posted by AmyPeterson on Sat, Feb 4, 2012, at 6:26 PM
  • -- Posted by Leah Cauthron on Tue, Feb 7, 2012, at 9:23 AM
  • It has also been reported that ingesting a lot of char from grilled meats can be linked to cancer. Yet, grilling is one of the healthier ways to cook meat. You can also cook starchy foods (in this case, potatoes) at high temps at home. This is not isolated to the fast food industry; I fail to see the hype, here. Also, is there a reason this post was written to sound like an end-times cryer on a street corner?

    -- Posted by notinia on Wed, Feb 8, 2012, at 2:25 PM
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